Lessons Learned from Resistance

sunila2 105x300 Lessons Learned from Resistance

Sunila Vig

To flow along with the river,

To sway along with the breeze,

To allow change to change me

And still hold my ground

To resist is to lock ourselves from change, both good and bad.

Resistance could be good when one resists something that will harm us in the long run- a temptation, a need to follow the trodden path just because it seems safer, resistance to domination by values, peoples, lifestyles which do not sit well with one’s own grain etc.

I am talking about the type of resistance one may face when about to do something that is good, healthful for us or the sort one faces when we simply like don’t like doing something, for eg: paperwork or the administrative duties that are attached to one’s task.

Greater the need bigger the resistance

I have found that the more necessary something is to me the greater the need to resist it. For eg: I teach yoga and I know that the Neti kriya, which is the process of pouring saline luke warm water into one nostril and allowing it to come out through the other nostril is to be done by me regularly to keep sinusitis and other ENT issues at bay. It is quite simple to execute as well. Do I do it regularly? I wish I could say yes.

Why?

I can make excuses about not having time, about being busy in the mornings trying to get my little one ready for school and fed breakfast in time. I won’t, because an excuse is always a sham, a cover-up. The thing with Kriyas is they have to be done first thing in the morning, on an empty stomach after a little joint loosening. So all I have to do is sleep a little earlier, wake up half an hour early and do my Neti. I am working on this is all I can say here.

Another point of resistance is with paperwork. Bank work, at the college, immigration and so on.  It has to be done, there’s no running away.

Why the resistance?

I tend to stall, postpone till I just have to do it. The mind steps in to say, “oh! This is so boring, why don’t we leave it for now, why don’t we do something more interesting, more exciting.” The mind feeds off what it labels as ‘interesting’ and soon sets a pattern of resistance. The trick is to separate oneself from all this tomfoolery going on within ourselves and see it for what it is.

For me, separating myself and enabling myself to do whatever needs be done is possible with focusing on the exhale. For you it could be another method. As I focus on the exhale breath going down towards my legs and the inhale breath rising towards my head, every resisting thought drops away.

So, when resistance to anything to be done, person or a feeling crops up within me, I now have begun to search for the root of it. It is illuminating to say the least.

 About Sunila Vig

Sunila lived in Australia for twelve years and all over India as a child. Now she lives in Bangalore, India with her family.

She is a lecturer of Communication to MBA students and is a practising Yoga teacher.
Sunila was introduced to books by book-loving parents at an early age and devoured them at every opportunity. Nature, music and art mean a lot to her and she loves solitude and noisy fun in equal measure.

She expresses herself through a variety of creative channels-singing, pottery, sketching and writing. Sunila writes fiction and poetry both in English and Hindi. Her debut collection of short stories in Hindi, “Nirjharr”, was published by the Karnataka Hindi Sahitya Parishad. Poetry and short stories authored by her have been published in a variety of medium. She is a Post graduate in English Literature from Kuvempu University in the verdant Malnad region of Karnataka, that has given the world a large number of writers and artists.

She can be reached through her FB page https://www.facebook.com/SunilaVigAuthor?ref=hl

Blog www.sunilavigauthor.blogspot.com

Twitter @whitefielder

 

 

 

Lessons Learned from Cleaning

sunila2 105x300 Lessons Learned from Cleaning

Sunila Vig

I am talking of the sort of cleaning most of us dislike, but have to do, either all the time or when the maid is on leave.

Dusting, scrubbing, sweeping/mopping floors, re-arranging the wardrobe- which is sure to get dishevelled within week, all of it the perpetual process of living in the houses of brick and mortar that we live in. What a wonderful thing it would be to still be living in jungles without the need of any of the mentioned drudgery.

The very same cleaning can become a teacher if we are open to learning from it.

Presence:

You may laugh at this but when I have allowed myself to sink into the moment and forget the world as I scrub away stains from the massive glass windows as I did today, it stops being a drudgery. The joy of seeing the stains go, the dust and grime replaced with shiny-clean surfaces is unparalleled. It gives one the opportunity to sink into the now fully, just be and enjoy the entire process.

Outer vs Inner:

As I clean my external surroundings I may sweat and my hair could well be all over the place but my mind starts to feel more fresh and well-arranged. Thus cleaning of outer cobwebs can translate into a clearing of inner confusions too.

Outlet for pent up emotions:

Many a time have I found that the very act of going rub-a-dub and using up physical energy in cleaning the space around me I have in the process gotten rid of any irritation n stronger negative emotions that I felt earlier on.

Grounding:

As with doing any simple task, cleaning with one’s own hands the area that one lives in or one’s work area or whatever it is that one cleans even once in a while, gives a greater feeling of being one with the life.

Awareness:

When I want my own space clean how can I bundle up the trash and throw it into the neighbouring unused plot. How can I see the garbage on the streets around and get de-sensitised to it. The need to contribute a little to keeping the city/countryside cleaner arises.

Self-satisfaction:

Finally there is the wonderful feeling of a task well done. The scrub I gave the bathroom floors today with new and powerful cleaning agents, (the maid was busy with other work) gave me such joy that I have gone into the two bath areas at least a couple of times to admire my handiwork and delight in the shining tiles. My little one added to this feeling of satisfaction with her compliments.

Likewise inner cleaning, Shuchi, ensures that we maintain clean spaces wherever we are and finally the inner and the outer co-mingle and become one.

 

About Sunila Vig

A yoga teacher and a writer, Sunila lived in Australia for twelve years and all over India as a child.  She is a lecturer of Communication to MBA students and a practising Yoga teacher who lives in Bangalore with her family.

Sunila was introduced to books by book-loving parents at an early age and devoured them at every opportunity. Nature, music and art mean a lot to her and she loves solitude and noisy fun in equal measure. She expresses herself through a variety of creative channels-singing, pottery, sketching and writing.

Sunila writes fiction and poetry both in English and Hindi.Her debut collection of short stories in Hindi, “Nirjharr”, was published by the Karnataka Hindi Sahitya Parishad. Poetry and short stories authored by her have been published in a variety of medium.

She is a Post graduate in English Literature from Kuvempu University in the verdant Malnad region of Karnataka that has given us a large number of writers and artists.

 

Lessons Learned from Sorrow

sunila1 105x300 Lessons Learned from Sorrow

Sunila Vig

Pain and pleasure make strange bedfellows and yet they are but two sides of the same coin. Every life is punctuated by joy and sorrow. As babies, we are happily oblivious but as we grow, we begin to rejoice at the very thought one and recoil at the mention of the other.

Same as any of you, I’ve had my share of pain and I am certain it is nothing when compared to what so many others have gone through. Some of it circumstantial and some of it that came my way through the choices I made. Some lives may have a pain graph with steeper highs and lows and some with a much more even line. In the end, it all evens out, one way or the other and either benefits or makes cynics out of us depending on how we choose to accept what lies on our plate.

The lessons that sorrow leaves behind are aplenty –

Introspection and exploration of oneself

If pain has come to me again and again from a similar situation, it has got me to finally explore my own self, think and work out what I could change in my thought process or way of doing things. Escaping from this process of introspection meant staying on in the vicious circle.

Compassion

The awareness that every creature undergoes sorrow/pain becomes even more acute giving rise to the belief that compassion is what everyone needs first and foremost.

Appreciation of the little things

Enjoyment of the nuances of life and understanding that each person’s life’s journey has it’s very own peculiar set of ups and downs can give rise in us the child-like wisdom of once again being able to see the pleasure every day brings with it, in many little ways.

Grounding

Pain keeps us grounded and connected to our mortality. If there were no sorrow I can only imagine that we would do whatever we wanted to do with aplomb, paying little heed to consequences.

Reduction of ego

That little monster within us which rears its head whenever it can gets cut to size with increased sensitivity.

Sense of oneness

When one realises that either by reaching out to others in a similar situation or just by glancing all around us with truly open eyes, we end up gaining comfort from realising that we are not solitary in whatever we face.

Acceptance versus fear

The understanding of the nature of things taught me that fear would only lead me astray, while acceptance would heal.

Creativity

This is a really interesting one I find and highly debatable too. Sorrow can give rise to and strengthen one’s creativity. Happiness can be so -absorbing that can be happy just be-ing. This is the state we would like to achieve, of course, but I find some truth in what Shelley said, the sweetest songs are those that come from the saddest thought.

Why do we naturally tend to want only pleasure even when we know this cannot be? Why does our own pain hurt us so much more than anyone else’s? Are we able to allow pain and pleasure wash over our lives and leave as easily as the seashore allows small waves, large waves, tidal waves to come and recede back into the sea, leaving behind treasures?

About Sunila Vig

Having lived in Australia the last twelve years and all over India as a child, Sunila lives in Bangalore currently with her family. She is a lecturer of Communication to MBA students and is a practising Yoga teacher.

Sunila was introduced to books by book-loving parents at an early age and devoured them at every opportunity. Nature, music, art mean a lot and she loves solitude and noisy fun in equal measure. She expresses herself through a variety of creative channels-Singing, Pottery, Sketching and Writing. Sunila writes fiction and poetry both in English and Hindi.

She has written sporadically and her debut collection of short stories in Hindi, “Nirjharr”, was published by the Karnataka Hindi Sahitya Parishad.   She is a Post graduate in English Literature from Kuvempu University.
She can be reached through her FB page https://www.facebook.com/SunilaVigAuthor?ref=hl

Blog www.sunilavigauthor.blogspot.comite

Twitter @whitefielder